CIP-ESEAP PUBLICATION

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Elske van de Fliert and Ann R. Braun.  1999.  Farmer Field School for Integrated Crop Management of Sweetpotato.  Field guides and Technical Manual.  Bogor, Indonesia: International Potato Center.  ISBN: 92-9060-216-3.

INTRODUCTION TO THE SWEETPOTATO ICM FARMER FIELD SCHOOL

Sweetpotato cultivation can be highly profitable for farmers.  When market prices are high, farmers' profits double or triple compared to those from growing rice.  The relatively high yield and low production costs contribute to this profitability, but unfortunately, in many places in the world sweetpotato prices fluctuate widely.  Sometimes, when price declines radically, sweetpotato farmers might have lose money.  The marketing system may also limit farmers' profits, particularly when middlemen are involved who make contracts with farmers to buy the standing crop.  Because farmers rarely know how to estimate the yield of the unharvested crop and are not fully aware of the prevailing prices at wider distribution markets, they are at a disadvantage in price negotiations with the trader and usually accept the offer with little discussion. Most farmers believe that profit is determined more by their luck in making a sale agreement with the trader than by the yield of the crop.

Highly fluctuating prices and a weak bargaining position influences farmersí attitudes towards sweetpotato cultivation because it provides little incentive to produce high yields. Nevertheless, comparison of yields and profits obtained by farmers in Indonesia showed a tendency for farmers who produced higher yields to earn higher profits. This suggests that farmers can increase profits by increasing their yields through better crop management, and by learning to estimate what the yield is likely to be before entering into negotiations with a trader. How can farmersí knowledge and skills be developed so that they can improve their crop management and business capacities? In this activity, farmers will analyze the relative importance of the sweetpotato enterprise and its constraints. ICM is presented as an alternative to tackle the constraints, and the FFS as a way to learn about ICM.


E-version in pdf format

Farmer Field School for Integrated Crop Management of Sweetpotato

Field Guides and Technical Manual

Chapters

Title

Size (kb)

Cover

Farmer Field School for Integrated Crop Management of Sweetpotato: Field Guides and Technical Manual

38

Contents

List of Contents

17

Foreword

Foreword in English

9

I - 01/07

An Introduction to the Farmer Field School for Intergrated Crop Management

510

II - 01

Introduction to the Sweetpotato ICM Farmer Field School

148

II - 02

A healthy soil

40

II - 03

Experimentation

48

II - 04

Healthy seed

22

II - 05

Observing the crop and its environments

59

II - 06

Economic analysis of the sweetpotato enterprise

28

II - 07

A healthy crop

35

II - 08

Natural enemies: the farmers' friends

90

II - 09

Sweetpotato pests

19

II - 10

Defoliation experiement

58

II - 11

Sweetpotato diseases

81

II - 12

Weeds: friends or foes?

42

II - 13

Aphids and other tiny insects

45

II - 14

Pesticides: medicine or poison?

62

II - 15

Fertilization

28

II - 16

Vine lifting

19

II - 17

Field area measurement

23

II - 18

Sweetpotato stemborer

45

II - 19

Sweetpotato weevil

59

II - 20

Cropping pattern

52

II - 21

Variety selection

11

II - 22

Harvesting and marketing

30

II - 23

Sweetpotato storage

15

II - 24

Sweetpotato utilization

11

II - 25

Sweetpotato ICM FFS evaluation

22

App - I

Group dynamic exercises

207

App - II

Forms for sweetpotato ICM FFS activities

58

III - 01

Introduction to Integrated Crop Management

67

III - 02

Crop health

98

III - 03

The agroecosystem

75

III - 04

Natural enemies

153

III - 05

Sweetpotato pests

125

III - 06

The sweetpotato enterprises

58

This publication is available in 4 languages (English, Indonesian, Spanish and Vietnamese).  

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